Move or Die! Sitting All Day Is Not Natural for Humans

Fact or Myth:

  • Ancient gladiators had a fully equipped gym with an outdoor area for tire flips and pushing the sled
  • Native Americans based their nomadic movements on where the local gyms were at
  • The United States Colonial Army used TRX classes to prepare for defeating the British

Which one of the above statements is correct?  That’s right, none of them!  Without gyms and health clubs, these people were studs and could literally kill a bear with nothing but a knife or bow and arrow after stalking the animal on foot for miles.  No Group X classes either for the women left at home while their husbands were away fighting or kidnapped by the enemy.  They too had to be strong and survive physical tasks just to get food on the table and care for the children.

Why am I going to this extreme to discuss health and fitness?  Because over 1/3 of American adults are considered obese.  Millions of workers and older adults increased their sitting time over the last 18 months from the pandemic, making them more susceptible to death from heart disease, COVID-19, diabetes, stroke, and falls (older adults).  As our ancestors showed us, you don’t need a modern gym to be healthy and active.

Movement throughout the day is natural for mammals, and humans are mammals.  Sitting and staring at your laptop and devices are not instinctual lifestyle patterns.  This is why you get that feeling to stand up and move around after being seated for hours, it is hardwired into our brains that movement is natural and must happen regularly. 

Photo by Alexander Suhorucov on Pexels.com

If you read LinkedIn articles, you have seen the topic about mental health problems from isolation and being chained to laptops for longer than when people went into the office.  Physical health problems are directly related to mental health problems, and both could be resolved with more physical activity daily.  This goes for adults and children on distance learning programs.  I’m not going down the rabbit hole of reopening schools or not.  Physical exercise and physical activity are mandated by the CDC for children to have proper mental and emotional health.  In fact, 150 minutes per week of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, with two days per week of bone and muscle strengthening, is the bare MINIMUM.

It’s time to stop the excuses for no gym membership.  Walking, doing push-ups and pull-ups at a park, and some basic stretching costs nothing, requires no home equipment, and suitable for all ages.  Pills, potions, and shakes do not and cannot replace physical activity and exercise.  To stay ahead of the Grim Reaper, you must get off the couch, turn off the device, and get moving!

Back to our ancestors, movement was part of their normal lives.  In today’s culture, you must make the decision to stay moving, or face the consequences of early death by disease and viral infections.  For me, it is a no brainer to stay active with hobbies I enjoy.  There are plenty of options that trick you into thinking you’re not exercising while you actually are.  Use your social networks to find bike rides, fun runs, baby & me, pub crawls, anything that includes moving while enjoying the company of others.  There is not a wrong answer for picking any activity that involves movement, fun, and socialization.

Get out and do something active daily for 30 days.  Share it on my Facebook page @athleteinthegameoflife, Twitter @MattPeale, or LinkedIn @MatthewPeale. Invite family and friends to participate with you.  Getting used to physical activity on a daily basis can do wonders for your mental health and positive attitude! 

To signup for my monthly newsletter, go to my website mattpeale.com.

Staying Grounded: How to Keep Your Feet & Ankles Healthy and Reduce Risk of Injuries

Do you have happy feet and ankles?  Yes, it may be an odd question and hard to define just what happy feet and ankles are.  For the purposes of this blog, happy feet do not refer to the animated movie or how you feel after getting a pedicure.  People that are unhappy with their feet and ankles are easy to pick out in a crowd.  They can’t stand very long, have possible issues walking or running, are prone to injuries, and may have swelling or inflammation regularly. 

Foot and ankle problems are not race, gender, sexual preference, age, or religious affiliation biased.  Many problems with your feet and ankles could be alleviated, or at least made less severe, by treating the muscles around your ankle joints a lot better.  Your knees could thank you also for being nicer to your feet and ankles.  Even your hips and low back benefit from heathy feet and ankles. 

Photo by Kindel Media on Pexels.com

April is National Foot Health Awareness Month by the American Podiatric Medical Association.  Most people take the health of their feet and ankles for granted, or that pain will stay with them forever.  This blog is to educate you to change your thinking on both.  Your feet and ankles are the foundation of balance and stability for the body when standing.  The major muscles around the ankle joint are the soleus and gastrocnemius, which compose the calf, and the anterior and posterior tibialis, which are on the shin.  The calf muscle points the toes down and the shin muscles point the toes up.  It’s vital to keep them in balance to avoid injuries and dysfunction all the way up to your lower back.

Typically, most people have overly tight calf muscles and overly weak shin muscles.  The calf muscles are one of the easiest muscles to stretch on the body.  The first stretch is very simple:  stand in a staggered stance with your feet facing forward, the back heel on the ground, front leg slightly flexed, back leg straight, and lean forward slightly.  Do not bounce, ease into the stretch and hold for 20 seconds then switch feet.  The second stretch is to put your heel on the ground in front of wall and point your toe up high as you can, like your foot is on the gas pedal.  Lean forward into the stretch keeping your toes pointed up, do not bounce, and keep the leg straight.  Hold each foot for around 20 seconds.

Calf stretch with toe up
Staggered stance calf stretch

Strengthening the shin muscles is also simple and can be integrated into your normal lifting program or done at home for overall health.  Walk like you have swim fins on, exaggerating your toes pointing up with each step as your heel strikes the ground.  Walk 30 total steps for 1-2 sets.  Another simple, not always easy, exercise to do is practice standing on one foot for 15-20 seconds.  If your balance is bad, stand close to a wall or stable object you can hold if you lose your balance.  Balance is a function of proprioception, how your body reacts to various stimuli in space.  It is a use it or lose it skill and can be regained through consistent practice. 

Keeping proper length-tension relationships with the muscles around your ankles can go a long way towards preventing Achilles’ tendon injuries, ACL injuries, low back pain, and shin splints.  While this list is not inclusive of all feet and ankle injuries, nor is it a fail proof method to avoiding all feet and ankle injuries, keeping the mobility, flexibility, and strength of this important joint is crucial for Activities of Daily Living (ADL).  If you’re a runner or weekend sports warrior, healthy feet and ankles are mandatory for providing the enjoyment you get from participating in such activities. 

Strengthening the anterior tibialis

For people with structural issues in their feet and ankles, please see a medical specialist who can help with your specific problems.  Wearing proper footwear for your activities that is in good condition is also important for avoiding injuries.  Ladies, high heels look great, but they are not your friend for keeping the ankles happy.  Also, performing squats elevating your heels also increases your chances for injuries by shortening your calf muscles and restricting range of motion.  Do NOT believe magazines and websites that tell you this position is great for your glutes.

To help you with ankle joint health, I have written an online course just for you called Overcoming Chronic Pain Through Stretching & Strengthening.  It provides pictures and videos for stretches and exercises that can help everything I mentioned in this blog.  I also guarantee or your money back after completing the course, if you do not see the results you desire.  Trust me, this can be life changing now and for years to come.  Check it out and also my website for more details and how to sign up today!

5 Minute Routine at Work to Reduce Back & Neck Pain

The end of the pandemic is here!  No, it’s not.  Yes, it is!  No, it’s not.

Whichever end of the spectrum you choose to believe in, the truth is your neck and back pain from siting are here to stay unless you do something about it.  Every article on LinkedIn pushes a hybrid working from home and going into the office.  Whether that is true or not remains to be seen.

Photo by Ivan Samkov on Pexels.com

A typical going into the office day:

  • 30–45-minute commute sitting each way (driving, carpool, public transportation)
  • 6-7 hours sitting at your desk, in a meeting, on sales calls, etc
  • 1 hour sitting at lunch
Photo by Liza Summer on Pexels.com

A typical home office day:

  • 8-9 hours sitting at your dining room table, couch, or home office chair
  • Driving an hour for carpool or sports practice
  • 1-2 hour sitting while on devices/TV at night

Regardless of which method or combination of methods you choose for work, developing chronic pain from sitting is guaranteed!  What the pandemic did was increase the attachment to devices by requiring workers to be on more meetings than before as a way to ensure people are “working”.  If you were in denial of feeling the pain before March 2020, you probably aren’t now.

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

How can you alleviate your muscle imbalances and pain while still being productive?  There are a number of stretches and exercises you can do standing next to your workstation, whether it’s in a traditional office sense or at your dining room office.  I’m asked in all my interviews by radio and podcast hosts how often should a person stand up and move around.  The answer is whenever possible.  Use that technology to set an alarm as a reminder to at least stand for two minutes every hour at the minimum. 

For those a little more ambitious that care about their health, here is a five-minute routine you can do twice or three times per day, without getting sweaty.

  • Arm flaps:  extend your arms at shoulder height to your sides, thumbs up.  With shoulders back, head looking forward and in line with your spine, raise your arms to touch thumbs above your head.  Lower them back to shoulder height in the starting position.  Repeat 15 times
  • Face pulls:  extend your arms in front of you at shoulder height palms facing down.  With shoulders back and head in line with your spine, pull your arms back toward your face, then return to the starting position.  Repeat 15 times.
  • 1 leg RDL with reach:  stand on one leg (use a wall or chair for balance if needed), extend the opposite arm at a 45-degree angle toward your head.  Reach across your body and touch the opposite knee of the leg you’re standing on keeping your arm straight and return to the starting position.  Do not lock your knee, keep it with a slight flex as you normally would while standing.  Repeat 10 times on one leg then switch.  As you get stronger and better balance, touch lower on your leg toward your foot.

These three movements can be done anywhere and anytime without weights.  All age groups (yes even kids doing online school) can do these and benefit.  The muscles worked are your hamstrings, rear deltoids, rhomboids, and mid trapezius.  These are muscles that get over-lengthened while sitting and typing on your laptop because you are hunched over.  Give them a try and email me at athleteinthegameoflife@gmail.com with how you feel after trying daily for a week.  You can also post on my Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.  Want more help?  Sign up for my course Overcoming Chronic Pain Through Stretching & Strengthening.  Guaranteed to make a difference or your money back!

How to Retain Clients: Experiences of a Fitness Professional to Help Your Business Grow

Client retention is the key to any successful business.  While acquiring new clients is the lifeblood of a growing business, it cost a lot less to keep them than constantly having to find new.  The fitness industry operates the same way.  How can professionals retain clients for services that are 100% based on disposable income?  There is no one single answer.  I will share my experiences to help you in whatever line of client business you are in.

The first step in retaining clients in a business based on disposable income is to have a salesperson mindset.  A huge problem in the fitness industry is that personal trainers think people will come to them because they look good and like working out.  That is the farthest thing from the truth!  Unfortunately, personal trainer certifications wait until the last chapter of a 500-page book to give any information on sales and marketing.  38 chapters are dedicated to anatomy, biology, physiology, and how to partner body parts together for an effective workout routine.  One chapter half the length of all the others gives any info on how to gain and retain clients.  The same goes for doctors, lawyers, and accountants to name a few.

Janet MacDonell

The second step is to work with a wide variety of clients with different goals and ages.  To many trainers want the perfect client who does everything like them and has the same amount of time to spend as they do.  The overwhelming majority of clients have jobs and families that require 99% of their attention.  A couple hours per week with you is not their life.  By working with a variety, you learn how to relate and adjust your style to different people based on where they are in their life.  I had a female trainer co-worker who only wanted to work with other females who were “serious” and had time two days per week at 5:00PM or 6:00PM.  Because she was so restrictive, she missed out on a long-term client that became one of my best friends.  Needless to say, she isn’t employed by the health club anymore or has any clients attempting to train privately.

The third step is to be a product of your product.  People only invest when they see a potential ROI.  Fat and out of shape trainers are broke.  It doesn’t mean you have to be a fitness model or competitive bodybuilder.  You do have to represent a healthy, active lifestyle, and be able to do the workout yourself that you’re making the client perform.  I say this because sometimes the obvious is not so obvious.

Rob Tepper

The fourth step is to be authentic.  People hire other service providers based on some type of emotional connection and justify with logic.  If you are fake, good luck in retaining any clients beyond an initial package.  Because fitness professionals are completely optional, clients are not required to stay with you or even finish out a package they purchased.  A person invested in you because they felt a connection that makes them want to show up before or after work when they have better things to do than waste it on a flake.  Some of my best friends were and are current clients.  You can maintain professionalism and cultivate personal relationships outside the gym when you are authentic.

Hank Adams

The fifth and final step is be teachable.  Continuing education credits are required for any professional service provider.  I’m not talking about going through those motions.  Listen to other gym members, co-workers, managers, and industry news.  Don’t be afraid to implement new ideas and techniques to keep your clients and you interested.  I always have my ears and eyes tuned to other trainers on how they work with their clients.  Give credit to them when you use their ideas and techniques.  It fosters a giving relationship at work and one of trust.  A couple other trainers bought and read my book.  I was honored they thought highly of me enough to invest into my philosophies and practices.

It is easy to think your business is different.  The truth is it really is not when dealing with people.  The service or product you represent is different, how you interact and relate to other humans is the same across all businesses.  For more info on how I work with clients, please email me, Matt Peale, at athleteinthegameoflife@gmail.com, and go to my website, mattpeale.com.

3 Tips to Choosing a Fitness Professional For Your Exercise and Health Goals

What makes a fitness professional worth the investment?  Working out on a few machines every week isn’t that difficult right?  Adjust the settings to your size, figure out a weight to do 10 reps with for a couple sets, and you transform into a fitness model in 30 days or less guaranteed!  That’s what social media and advertisements have you to believe.

Since I was a early teenager I have been attracted to working out.  Even though I played soccer most of my life along with other sports growing up, weight training was something I knew I needed for better athletic performance and because I had little self-confidence as a thin kid.  As most teen boys wanted, I also had the desires to bulk up and look HUGE!  All I needed was to lift a bunch of heavy weights, read some bodybuilding magazines, and instant massive physique! Wrong.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Finally, at the age of 18 I received my first gym membership after working out in my room with a curl bar and doing push-ups and pull-ups.  Unfortunately, I still had no idea what I was really doing until I studied for and became a personal trainer in 2008.  I went 15 years of bumbling along reading only the same bodybuilding magazines as a guide.  Let me guess, you have done basically the same thing with some kind of magazine and now YouTube sensation to guide you.  I’m willing to bet a large sum of money you also are still clueless and have not achieved what you want regarding your athletic performance and overall health.

A fitness professional is an investment, no doubt.  Remember that fitness professionals also made an investment in themselves by spending $400-$500 on a certification, sometimes multiple certifications.  Plus, they have continuing education credits to maintain that certification, which are also a financial investment.  Fitness professionals are not just the biggest guys and hottest girls in the gym. 

How do you know who to invest in for your health and fitness goals?  I’ll share with you three characteristics of a good fitness professional.

  • Relationship oriented: they show a true interest in their clients beyond taking their money.  You truly matter to them beyond the 30 or 60 minutes a couple times per week.
  • They are a product of their product: they “look” the part and enjoy being fit.  A fitness professional doesn’t have to be the biggest, fastest, strongest, and best looking, they do need to exemplify a healthy, active lifestyle. 
  • Their own workouts are similar to what you enjoy: fitness professionals train others similarly to how they workout, it’s being human.  Watch them and see if you gravitate to their style.

Not all clients stay with the same professional, and that is fine.  Work with a few until you feel comfortable.  Ask them questions about their experiences both in fitness and life overall.  If you’re a 55- year-old male, a 27-year-old female may not understand what’s going on in your stage of life.  The relationship has to be win-win.  Fitness professionals are also counselors because our clients are in a vulnerable state and they feel comfortable sharing about their lives.  Being able to trust each other is crucial for maintaining a long-term relationship.

You are investing in their knowledge and expertise to get you where you have not been able to go.  If you’re health is worth it, then hiring a fitness professional is worth it.  Just like having a CPA.  Sure, you can do your own taxes, is it worth the risk of fines, penalties, and levies if the job isn’t done right?  Only you know the answer to that.  Your health is the same risk assessment.

For questions about my experiences with clients, email me at athleteinthegameoflife@gmail.com.  Go to my website and learn how to be on the Athlete in the Game of Life Team to receive a FREE copy of my book.

10 Minutes a Day Keeps Heart Disease Away. WFH Tip for Simple Home Workouts

How many 10-minute blocks of time do you waste mindlessly scrolling through social media platforms daily?  And at the end of that 10 minutes, nothing productive happened except you are a little dumber now than before.  In that same small amount of time, you can reduce your risk of hypertension and cognitive decline all from your living room office.  Not to mention feel and look better.

Photo by mikoto.raw on Pexels.com

I’m sure you heard of Tabata, 20 seconds of activity followed by 10 seconds of rest then repeat in four minute circuits.  It fades in and out of being trendy, and always stays effective.  A full Tabata workout is 16 minutes (4 circuits of 4 minutes each), you can add or subtract to that time based on your fitness level and available workout time.  No special equipment is needed, just a little courage to try something new and a timer.

With connectivity up two more hours working from home than at the office, taking a few minutes for physical activity is essential for physical AND mental health.  If your gyms are closed, you only have at home indoor options.  The CDC says bouts of activity lasting little as five minutes have beneficial effects on the brain if they are moderate-to-vigorous.  Boom! You’re winning the mental health battle already! Your heart benefits automatically when you elevate it from exercise, regardless of the type, another win.

Photo by Alexy Almond on Pexels.com

People tend to complicate exercise by thinking it has to be elaborate moves with multiple equipment types.  If you ever worked on a farm, you know how heavy the workload can be and not a barbell to be found, yet your body is put through the ringer.  A Tabata workout is similarly effective.  I jokingly call these types of workouts “prison style” because it’s just lifting your body weight various ways.  If you were stuck in an 8×8 cell, you can do the following workout:

Circuit 1: 4 minutes, do the exercises consecutively 20 seconds of work 10 seconds rest, then repeat for 2 total circuits.

  • Body weight back row pulling yourself towards the bars
  • Squat jumps
  • Push ups
  • Bicycle crunches

Circuit 2:  Same as circuit 1 flow

  • Pike push ups
  • 2 leg glute/hamstring bridges
  • 2-foot hops
  • Mountain climbers

Total time with even a brief rest between circuits, 10 minutes.  No equipment provided in jail.  At home you could hang underneath your dining room table and do the body weight row, everything else can all be done with a small floor space.  Sure, working from home may seem prison-like now after almost a year, so I get it.

Most music apps have a Tabata playlist which includes the timing for start/stop.  If you have dumbbells and/or a resistance band, now you’re really in business!  There are no wrong answers for exercises, just make sure every part of your body is worked at least once.  If you’re a newbie, one round may be enough at this intensity.  If you’re a novice, two rounds are great.  10 minutes, three times per week can make a major positive impact on your health.  Give it a try!  As you gain experience, add more circuits throughout the day.  Compared to wasting an hour daily on social media with no physical and mental benefits, you have now changed your outlook on life.  Congratulations!

For questions about Tabata, feel free to email me at athleteinthegameoflife@gmail.com.  Go to my website and order my new book, The Athlete in the Game of Life, to learn how exercise impacts the brain.  Plus listen to my interviews from radio stations all over the country.  I promise you will learn more than you imagined!

Moderation Examples, Not Extreme Behavior to Achieve Your Resolutions

Extreme right wing, extreme left wing.  Extreme heat, extreme cold.  Obesity, anorexia.  Overuse injuries, injuries from underutilization.

When it comes to new health and fitness goals, extremes are way to common for January resolutions.  Waking up at 5:00AM to run 3 miles when you never wakeup before 6:00AM and haven’t run since PE in high school.  Drop 40 pounds on a liquid diet in 15 days, and you barely drink 3 glasses of water per day.  What are the odds of success in these situations?  Not much.

Photo by Charlotte May on Pexels.com

As a fitness industry expert, I have personally gone through different extremes with my body.  None of these extremes have ever lasted long for many reasons.  The body and mind cannot deal with depravation and over training for long periods of time without injuries.  What has lasted is a moderation of healthy lifestyle habits and activities that I enjoy.  The lessons learned from training for a bodybuilding contest and elite level obstacle course races, helps me maintain a fitness level that works for my personality and body type.

  • “I need someone to be super strict with me or I’ll never lose weight.”
  • “I have to workout for two hours every day.”
  • “I’m cutting all carbs from my diet and eating only meat.”

Do any of these statements make you nod your head in agreement?  If so, has that thought process worked for you beyond the length of a program/diet/contest?  If the answer to the first question is yes, the answer to the second is no.  You have reverted back to your previous self and feel like a failure for doing so.  This cyclic behavior is self-destructive and why your resolutions never work every year.

Regardless if you started and stopped already, or haven’t started yet, try a new moderate approach to changing your lifestyle.

  • No alcohol Sunday-Thursday
  • Replace soft drinks with flavored mineral water
  • Join a group to try new physical activities like hiking or cycling

In an article on NPR about a Swedish study on factors that help keep resolutions, ones that are for pleasurable activities instead of depriving are more successful.  Moderation in your lifestyle can lead to better choices overall.  Look at choices about exercise and food changes with an “if I do x, then I adjust y”.  For example, you’re going to dinner with friends on Thursday night.  Adjust your breakfast and lunch choices to allow for anything you want at dinner.  You fully enjoy the outing without guilt and still on track for your goals. 

NPC Physique competition 2014

Life is meant to be lived, not constantly have the fun taken away.  For 6 years I have maintained body fat percentage around 10% or less.  I don’t skip meals, turn down alcohol, or workout excessively.  The hard work was done during the bodybuilding contest prep.  Since then, I learned that is not the lifestyle for me.  Overall, I don’t drink sodas, keep alcohol to the weekends, and don’t buy sugary foods at the grocery store.  Total calories I eat are more than most people daily, the food is just not processed and full of fat. 

2021 doesn’t feel much different so far than 2020.  What you can take into the new year is a more focused view on your health and fitness to strengthen your immunity and reduce risk factors for heart disease, obesity, and diabetes.  In turn, you will be happier and have more self-confidence to take on the challenges 2021 will bring you.

For help with your goals, feel free to email me at athleteinthegameoflife@gmail.com.  Join the Athlete in the Game of Life Team on my website and receive a free copy of my book!

On Your Butt and In Pain – From My Book The Athlete in the Game of Life

I have a client who has no choice — she has to sit on the job.

That’s because she’s an amputee who lost her left lower leg in a lawn mower accident as a child. She now works in medicine, assisting surgeries for most of the day and in her office for the remaining hours—and during all that time, she’s sitting. When she started experiencing pain because of it, she came to me. Since I’m a Corrective Exercise Specialist, I was able to assess and work with her in addressing the dysfunction in her hips and hamstrings, the result of prolonged sitting.

Many fitness trainers, however, ignore those particular muscles. They’re used to guys who want to bulk up the upper half of their bodies and women who focus on glutes, quadriceps, triceps, and anything abdominal related. So, I felt gratified and validated when my client showed me an article in a magazine dedicated to helping amputees in all aspects of life. The article suggested all the exercises I had her do in previous sessions to increase mobility and strength in her hamstrings and hips — and she was impressed that I knew to focus on those muscles, since I had never worked with an amputee before.  I told her it was simply a result of all my experience working with executives and other individuals who were relatively sedentary — I learned over time where the physical problems hit the hardest and how to correct those imbalances.

It all centers on the hips. From an evolution standpoint, we weren’t built to sit for long periods of time. Your muscles have to work overtime to support it, and you end up stretching hamstring muscles, tightening your quadriceps and remodeling your hips. Also, nerves can become compressed and common issues such as sciatica (back pain) can occur.

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

When you stop sitting and decide to get upright, you’ve got more potential problems on your hands — or more accurately, in your hips. When you go to stand up, you end up trying to put the pelvis back into a standing position and some of these muscles get irritated and strained in the process. Lower back pain is a frequent result. The hips, while often overlooked, are critical to your body’s alignment of your legs and torso. They must be strong to do that job — but sitting weakens them and gravity suddenly becomes your worst enemy. Your legs will collapse inward, put pressure on your kneecaps and eventually cause flat feet.

But at any rate, now you’re standing. When you go ahead and take a step, however, and the hips are no longer strong enough to hold themselves up, you end up with hip pain. Meanwhile, the lower back tries to take some of the burden off the hips — and that’s not good for the lower back. The pain that results travels up the spine and in your neck. And you can also end up throwing out your lower back.

All of this negatively affects your posture, because you’re twisting your muscles into positions they don’t much care for. Those muscles become strained and it creates more weakness in your body.

Photo by Gabby K on Pexels.com

The fact is mobility in the hips is key to movement in all directions. The glutes are the largest muscle of the body and responsible for producing power when you squat, lunge, jump, swing a golf club, pick up a bag of mulch, and all other movements related to bending at the knee and lowering your hips. All those movements become much more difficult when your hips lack the strength and flexibility to function properly. As you grow older, you begin to have basic balance issues and falls are the unfortunate result. I actually see this developing in people as young as their early 40’s!

To order my book, The Athlete in the Game of Life, go to my website mattpeale.com and click the banner at the top. You can also download my free report on back pain to enter for a free signed copy of my book. You win either way!

15 Minutes of Stretching and Strengthening a Day Preserves Your Back and Brain, Guaranteed

The virus rages on across the globe doing exactly what a virus does, spreads and mutates.  What also rages on is the push to work from home and not go back into the office.  Some companies like Google, are offering a split work week to compromise on the benefits of both.  While it’s not my place to opine on how a company needs to manage its workforce, I can take an expert position on what constant connectivity can do to your physical and mental health.

There’s a popular commercial that says, “15 minutes can save you hundreds on your car insurance.”  My phrase says, “15 minutes of stretching and strengthening a day preserves your back and brain, guaranteed.”  How can that be you ask?  Let’s look at this from a simple time standpoint:

  • Hold a stretch for each leg @ 20 seconds each twice a day = 1 minute 20 seconds
  • Perform a strengthening exercise for each leg for 15 reps twice a day = 2 minutes
  • Repeat the sequence for a similar stretch/strengthen on the shoulder area = 3 minutes 20 seconds
  • March in place at your home “desk” for 4 minutes twice a day = 8 minutes
  • Total time is 14 minutes and 40 seconds
Glute bridge activation
Dumbbell scaption

You don’t need a gym, health club, or heavy dumbbells to do any of it.  You can also break it into a morning and afternoon break.  No athletic skill, talent, and coordination is required.  Gender equality also exists because these benefits apply to all HUMANS! 

Here is the research that supports my guarantee:

  • The effects are found across a variety of forms of physical activity, including aerobic activity (e.g., brisk walking), muscle-strengthening activity, yoga, and play activities (e.g., tag or other simple low organizational games)*
  • A single bout of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity will reduce blood pressure, improve insulin sensitivity, improve sleep, reduce anxiety symptoms, and improve cognition on the day that it is performed.*
  • Strong evidence demonstrates that acute bouts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity have a transient benefit for cognition, including attention, memory, crystalized intelligence, processing speed, and executive control during the post-recovery period following a bout of exercise.*
  • The largest positive effects are observed from 11 to 20 minutes after the bout of activity.*
  • *Source: 2018 CDC Physical Activity Guidelines Advisory Committee Report

I called said insurance company to a quote to reduce my current rate, they couldn’t do it.  On the contrary, when you follow these CDC guidelines in conjunction with specific exercise I can provide you through my programs, you are guaranteed to reduce risk factors for diseases, improve your mood and boost productivity.  For more information on how 15 minutes a day preserves your back and brain, guaranteed, email me at athleteinthegameoflife@gmail.com TODAY!

You Have “Text Neck”. Why? Because You’re Staring Down at Your Phone All Day

“Text Neck” is a term coined by Dr. Dean Fishman, after he noticed more and more  people were coming to his office with the same complaint — they all had neck pain, headaches, shoulder pain, or numbness and tingling into the upper extremity. This was concurrent with the rapid rise of smartphone usage.

After studying the new phenomenon, it was found that text neck (also called “iHunch” by some) leads to premature wear-and-tear on the spine and degeneration. It’s also become a pretty widespread condition. “It is an epidemic or, at least, it’s very common,” Dr. Kenneth Hansraj, chief of spine surgery at New York Spine Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, told The Washington Post. “Just look around you, everyone has their heads down.”[1]

Photo by Oladimeji Ajegbile on Pexels.com

You might ask, “So what’s the big deal with putting your head down to check out an email?”

Fair enough. Let’s start with the fact that the typical human head weighs about 12 pounds. And the neck is fine with holding that amount of weight up, it was made to carry heads around, right?

Right. However…

When you bend that neck forward and down to check out something on your phone, the weight impact increases on your cervical spine (the structure of bones, nerves, muscles, ligaments, and tendons that extends from the base of your skull to the top of your shoulders). For example, at a 15-degree angle, your head puts 27 pounds of pressure on your neck. At a 30-degree angle, it’s 40 pounds. At 60 degrees, it’s 60 pounds.

That’s a lot. 

Imagine carrying an 8-year-old around your neck several hours a day (and just imagine it, don’t try to actually do it!) and you’ll get the idea.

As you stretch the tissue for a long period of time, it gets sore and inflamed. That causes muscle strain, pinched nerves, herniated disks and, over time, it can even remove the neck’s natural curve. And the other thing to keep in mind is you’re also engaging in poor posture when you’re in the “text neck” position and that causes other problems. Experts say it can reduce lung capacity by as much as 30 percent as well as cause neurological issues, depression and heart disease.

Oh, and those headaches you might think are being caused by the tension and stress of your job? The truth is it’s highly likely they’re being caused by text neck because it’s another common symptom. They feel exactly like tension headaches…but aren’t.

I know it’s silly to think all these bad things can happen just as a result of staring at your smartphone. But Google “text neck” for yourself and you’ll see for yourself — these physical outcomes are all the real deal.


[1] Lindsay, Bever, “Text Neck Is Becoming an Epidemic and Could Wreck Your Spine,” The Washington Post, 11/20/2014 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/11/20/text-neck-is-becoming-an-epidemic-and-could-wreck-your-spine/

If you want to read more about “Text Neck”, and other chronic pain issues, go to my website and order my new book Athlete in the Game of Life.