Tips for Healthy Eating While Working From Home

You are what you eat.  I’m sure you heard that numerous times in your life.  March is National Nutrition Month by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.  If you’ve been working from home or sheltering in place, your eating habits may not be as healthy as they used to be last year.  Without dressing up for work, moving around much, and easy access to your kitchen for random snacking, the “WFH 15” may have invaded your waistline.

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Fear not!  March is the perfect month to regain control of your eating habits, and it can taste good too!  Week 1 encourages you to eat a variety of nutritious foods daily.  Try a new fruit or vegetable this week.  Raw is always the healthiest way and gives you the true flavor.  Pick fruits and vegetables with different colors because they have different antioxidants and nutrition profiles.  Also drink plenty of water, not soft-drinks and juices.  If you haven’t read a nutrition label before, read a few on the items you normally buy, could be eye opening!

Week 2 is about planning your meals.  From my experience, this is where people fall off the wagon.  When you don’t know what your next meal is, you make impulse choices which usually aren’t good!  You’re in a rush and find yourself starving!  The downhill spiral begins and it’s hard to stop.  Plan healthier meals with your family for everyone to learn new ideas and get on board with healthy lifestyle choices.  It doesn’t have to suck when one person is on a “diet” and can’t eat the same as others in the house.  By planning and cooking healthier, good tasting food, everyone enjoys together and reaps the benefits.

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Week 3 is taking your planning from the previous week and learning new skills to make delicious dishes that are good for you.  Try using fresh herbs, or new spices on meat, chicken, and fish that you already cook.  Stay away from breaded and fried, all you are tasting are breadcrumbs and flower anyway, not the protein you are frying.  You may even feel better and not have a stomach-ache after eating grilled and backed items instead of fried.  Wasting food truly is a sin in many ways.  Make smaller portions or reuse the leftovers in different dishes if you’re sick of the same taste.  Freeze what you don’t use after three days in the fridge if possible.  Your wallet will thank you also because a dollar can be stretched when you repurpose food items for other dishes.  How do you think gumbo and jambalaya became popular?

Week 4 is a good time to make an appointment with a Registered Dietician Nutritionist (RDN).  An RDN is educated on how to work with any special diseases and conditions you have.  They can also give more detailed guidance for weight loss and sports performance than a personal trainer or Corrective Exercise Specialist as myself.  Knowledge truly Is power and combining an RDN’s knowledge with a fitness professional’s knowledge gives you the total package for maximizing and enjoying a healthy, active lifestyle.

You can’t out lift, run, or cycle a bad diet.  Poor refueling choices have negative effects on everything you do and feel physically.  Being sedentary multiplies your bad choices to increase health risk factors like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and stroke.  Those are three of the top five killers of Americans annually, and many could be prevented.  Add to it COVID-19 as a risk factor, and you know who has the most negative effects and chance of death, people who are obese.  Approximately 1/3 of all adult Americans are considered obese by the CDC, this does not include the millions that are overweight and headed to obesity.

For more information on nutrition and healthy eating choices, go to myplate.gov, cdc.gov, and eatright.org.

Reject the Resolutions in 2021!

Reject the Resolutions for 2021!  Am I crazy?  Well, yes, I am to an extent.  At least I now have your attention!

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Every January is like Groundhog Day for the same resolutions that go unresolved year after year:

  • Lose 20-30 pounds by February 2nd
  • Make 20% more income by March 1st
  • Run a marathon by February 30th

Why do we put ourselves through this process like a bunch of zombies who continue down the same road?  First it starts with a mindset of making small, weekly changes that are enjoyable.  If you don’t have enjoyment in some of the process, you won’t stick to the results.  Second, forgiveness of yourself if a day or two doesn’t go as planned.  You miss a day of exercise and have a piece of cake, so what.  Your resolution isn’t done and over, to wait for another year.  Tomorrow get back on your plan like the previous day didn’t exist.  Third, be a little vaguer in your steps to achieving a goal.  If you’re goal is to lose 20 lbs and you hate jogging and early mornings, don’t set the process to running at 5:30AM, four days per week.  Go hiking (an urban hike around your town also counts) with a friend twice per week at a time that suits your mood and schedule.

Here’s an example of what changing your mindset to a healthy lifestyle looks like:

  • Exercise twice per week
  • Drink water when I’m thirsty instead of soft drinks
  • Join a group for running a 5K

These new plans are FREE, have wiggle room if you miss a day or two, and can have fun in the process.  You may look at this new list and think it’s very doable, that’s the point!  Think about your goals for 2021.  How can you create them to be enjoyable, vaguer, and attainable?  There are many right answers.

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In a study by Per Carlbring in Sweden, he analyzed two groups who made resolutions.  One group was specific and had support from friends and groups to achieve their goals.  The second group was more uncertain and received minimal to no support from groups and friends.  Believe it or not, the second group was more successful!  55% of the second group’s participants achieved their resolutions.  Another factor that led to a higher success level was trying something new instead of cutting something out, or deprivation.  When you try something new, more happiness is usually involved than depriving yourself of something that previously made you feel good, even if it wasn’t good for you.

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Make 2021 a year of happiness and enjoyment to becoming healthier and more active.  2020 sucked, we all know and are ready for its continuation to end.  Start today, you don’t have to wait until Monday to add a smile to your daily ritual.  Smiling takes less effort than frowning, remember, and it matches every outfit in your closet!

For more information on how to be healthier and active in 2021, go to my website mattpeale.com, or email me at athleteinthegameofife@gmail.com.  To register for an autographed copy of my new book The Athlete in the Game of Life, download my free report on back reducing back with tips your doctor doesn’t even know.

Raging With Your Machine. How to Fuel the WFH Body – From Athlete in the Game of Life

The following is an excerpt from my new book, Athlete in the Game of Life, available on Amazon and on my website.

For the moment, however, I want to remind you that your body is a machine. And all machines need the right fuel to keep them operating at peak efficiency.

If you haven’t guessed already, I’m about to talk about a big four-letter word — diet.

The first three letters of the word “diet” spell out “die” — and maybe that’s why people hate to think about it. But instead, maybe we should all make an effort to stop associating healthy food choices with death!  So, lose the term “dieting” and instead, embrace the good feelings you’ll gain just from changing up what you’re eating. It can make a big difference to your overall wellbeing.

Let me break down some primary food categories and how much you should be eating of each.

  • Carbohydrates

Fruits, vegetables, grains, beans are all examples of carbs. You’ll also find some in nuts and dairy products. Carbs have been a little demonized by the media and the no-carb diet fanatics, but your body likes to use them for energy — so ignore everyone and put ‘em on your plate. You need carbs after a workout to replace your glycogen (which helps you maintain your blood-glucose levels). What you want to avoid is processed and sugary goods that contain them.

According to the Institute of Medicine, carbs should make up 45 to 65% of your daily caloric intake.

  • Fats

Fats are another victim of food prejudice, but the truth is they also aren’t always bad for you. Olive oils, fish and avocados are all healthy sources of fat, while processed and artificial foods deliver unhealthy fats. In any event, it’s almost impossible to entirely eliminate fats from your daily diet, as most foods we eat contain them. Just educate yourself by reading food labels to make sure you’re having the suggesting serving size to minimize fat consumption. Fats are worse than carbs, because a gram of fat has FIVE MORE CALORIES than a gram of carbs. So tread carefully.

According to the Institute of Medicine, fats should make up 20%-35% of your daily caloric intake.

  • Proteins

As most of you know, meat, eggs and seafood all contain protein. You’ll also find it in beans, legumes, nuts and dairy. Ingesting protein contributes to a healthy lifestyle, but keto-style diets centering around protein-packed foods isn’t recommended for long-term health. To build lean muscle mass, protein is a must — your muscles use it to rebuild after a workout.

According to the Institute of Medicine, protein needs to compose 10%-35% of total caloric intake.

To learn more about preventing injuries, increasing mobility, reducing joint pain, and getting more out of life, please go to my website, mattpeale.com.  I offer group and personal instruction via Zoom weekly sessions to help your tennis, golf, workouts, and lifestyle hobbies.  Download my free report, 3 Tips to Reduce Back Pain Your Doctor Doesn’t Know.  Guaranteed to open your eyes and give you a new direction on staying healthy and active you didn’t know possible!

PE Teachers as Health Coaches

Health coach.  It’s a term used by almost everyone in the health, fitness, and wellness field to describe what they do or their actual title.  A health coach is not a graduate of any college or university, nor is it required to be certified in any type of health, fitness, or wellness training.  One vital occupation that fills the role of a health coach and gets none of the credit is a PE teacher.

In theory, and not always practice, a PE teacher is your first experience with anyone knowledgeable in health, fitness, sports, and wellness.  The elementary school PE teacher provides kids their initial dive into what being a healthy and fit person means.  Doing the job correctly means being a healthy and fit person yourself as a role model, and consistently learning how to make a larger impact on the health, fitness, and wellness of your students.  Unfortunately, this view is not currently taken by PE teachers, administrators, parents, and students.

From a business standpoint, many network marketing companies instruct their distributors to label themselves as health coaches to describe their work in selling nutritional supplements.  Yes, I have worked in that business arena extensively in the past.  Truthfully, a network marketer has more nutrition education and information than a PE teacher, which is extremely sad!  PE teachers receive minimal to no education and professional development about nutrition and healthy eating to share with their students.  Have you seen the childhood obesity problem?  The lack of education given to kids is a significant part of the problem as they become adults with buying power.  The CDC says barely 56% of health teachers across the United States even receive professional development on nutrition at all.  FYI, health teacher and PE teacher are not always the same person.

My company Movement Academy recently conducted a PD for a New Orleans area school district’s PE teachers.  As a personal trainer I can give guidelines and general facts about healthy eating and macro nutrients, but no specific diet recommendations.  The teachers in our sessions were generally clueless about healthy eating and discussed little to nothing with their students.  They all agreed overweight and poorly fueled kids are an issue yet didn’t think their jobs were to give students any insight.  That blew my mind!  Physical education is not about dodge ball, kickball, and only sports.  Healthy eating is crucial to overall physical fitness and on the same level as teaching movement skills before sports skills.

Here’s a thought, change the title from elementary school PE teacher to elementary school health coach.  Make it incentive pay based on health assessments and indicators of the students in a school.  Who cares how far a kid can throw the football, what is his disease risk factors score.  Is he a candidate for type 2 diabetes and heart disease?  The health coach not doing his or her job doesn’t receive the top pay.  That’ll get some of the roll out the ball PE teachers actually doing their job!  The teachers may even speak up and have their school leadership pay for worthwhile professional development to help them hit their incentives.  And oh btw, academic performance and attendance just tripled while behavioral issues dropped by 50% under such a program.

“Hi, kids!  I’m Mr. Matt, your health coach this year.  We are starting every class with a cheer about healthy eating.  After that we are learning some awesome skills together so you can have more fun and energy!  First, everyone has to smile and be ready to move.  Ready, here we go!”